Artist of the Week: Adoni Astrinakis

Posted on Posted in Artist of the Week

Andreja

This week, we talked to the talented artist, Adoni Astrinakis.

twiggy_whiter-background

BYMG: How did you get started?

AA: Well, it definitely wasn’t by design!

I’m untrained. I hadn’t painted for 14 years (since High School). I completed my business studies at University, then ran my own company; although ultimately successful, it went through some pretty intense cycles. I took to painting again almost subconsciously. I guess I was pushing it below the surface all those years, and one day it just came out.

I began posting my work on social media and was fortunate enough that when people started seeing the work, they related to it. I trusted in that and now I’m painting full time.

I feel like it’s what I’m meant to be doing.

Elvis II in situ 1

BYMG: Who or what influences your work? 

AA: When I was really little, I was searching for dinosaur books on the bookshelf and instead found a book on Michelangelo. It contained all of his sketches and works. I was completely infatuated. His works are incredible, and he never even considered himself a painter! Can you believe that?

I love Warhol’s use of pop imagery. I was always taken by that.

Chuck Close’s stunning portraits are also an influence. He was introduced to me after I began painting again, such an incredible talent.

I also love the work of photographer’s Jerry Schatzberg, Richard Avedon and Martin Schoeller.

bridgit_bardot

BYMG: What’s the big message you want readers to take away from your work? 

AA: There’s a tendency to want to overcomplicate things and I try to stay away from that.

Everybody’s different.

Some might find the work simple, others complex. I just hope they’re captivating in some way—that there’s an essence, or a spirit that resonates. Something that makes you just stop for a moment, that’s all I can ask for.

Corn Kid in situ (bed)

BYMG: Do you have a particular time of day that feels the best for you to create? A specific space? Or do you just get to it when and where the mood strikes?

AA: Well, I work in my home/studio so the pieces are constantly staring at me! Problem is I can’t stop staring back so I’m always tinkering with something. A lot of the time it’s a balancing act between feeling the right mood and meeting a deadline.

The most important thing for me is to always feel inspired to do the best work I can, even if I have to dig for it sometimes.

bob_dylan

BYMG: What is your process like? Do you typically finish a piece in one day, or take breaks and come back to it?

AA: It happens in bursts.

I work free-hand without the aid of projection or grinding techniques so the concentration is intense. I kind of go at it at full pace until I tire out, take a breather and then go at it again. Works can take up to 2 or 3 weeks. 

My only rule when I paint is that once I’ve finished a piece, it has to be an artwork I’d want to keep myself. If that standard isn’t met, it isn’t finished.

BYMG: Favorite creation so far this year?

AA: Tough question, that’s like choosing your favourite child! I’ve just completed a piece of Paul Newman, that’s probably the one. 

 

Adoni AstrinakisTo find out more about Adoni and his artwork, please visit his website, or find him on Facebook and Instagram. You can also connect with him through email.

 

Pass it on! xoxoPin on PinterestEmail this to someoneBuffer this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Tumblr

Continue the conversation...